Motion-driven enhancement of a lower region cue in depth perception

  • Yuki Kubota Information Somatics Laboratory, RCAST, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; and NTT Communication Science Laboratory, Kanagawa, Japan
  • Ryota Mima Information Somatics Laboratory, RCAST, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
  • Takahiro Kawabe NTT Communication Science Laboratory, Kanagawa, Japan
  • Taiki Fukiage NTT Communication Science Laboratory, Kanagawa, Japan
  • Masahiko Inami Information Somatics Laboratory, RCAST, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
Keywords: depth illusion, depth order, lower region cue, motion-defined boundary

Abstract

The authors report a demonstration in which a motion-defined boundary enhances the effects of a lower region cue in depth perception. Although the lower region cue has been proposed as a potential depth cue, its effect is weak in the static image. Their demonstration reveals that the lower region is almost unambiguously perceived as being in front when defined by horizontal motion mimicking motion parallax. The authors further investigated phenomenological aspects of the lower region cue by combining it with other depth cues.

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Published
2022-04-14
How to Cite
KubotaY., MimaR., KawabeT., FukiageT., & InamiM. (2022). Motion-driven enhancement of a lower region cue in depth perception. Journal of Illusion, 3. https://doi.org/10.47691/joi.v3.8028
Section
Phenomenal reports